AEP Sustainability - Volunteerism

Volunteerism at AEP

Supporting community projects and programs requires more than financial support. It requires time and labor to make progress possible. Every year, AEP employees from around our service territory give their time, talent and financial donations to a variety of organizations in the communities where we live and work. Our employees are a consistent force making our communities stronger and better when times are good and when hardship strikes.

The AEP volunteer spirit prevailed even in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. Employees from across the system applied for and received AEP Making a Difference grants to help local nonprofit organizations in their service territory. From Tulsa, Oklahoma to Pikeville, Kentucky, and points in between, 47 organizations received grants of up to $300 each. Teams of employee volunteers worked with the organizations to conduct virtual or COVID-safe back-to-school, food and clothing drives, beautification projects and more.

In 2021, we will enhance our corporate-wide volunteer program with a more robust tracking tool to capture the good work being done by our employees. We hope that the new tool will encourage employees to sign up for unique volunteer events and significantly increase the time our employees spend volunteering to support their local communities.

In 2020, Read to Me Day was transformed into a virtual event, with a collection of 20 read-aloud videos created, to commemorate the 20th year of the program.

The Power of Our People: Read to Me Day Goes Virtual

In 2020, Appalachian Power marked the 20th anniversary of its annual Read to Me Day event. Read to Me Day is an important community event for Appalachian Power employees and in 2020 they found a creative way to ensure the 20th year of Read to me Day was a success. The event usually involves employees reading books in-person to students at more than 400 elementary schools in our West Virginia, Virginia and Tennessee service territory. In 2020, Read to Me Day was transformed into a virtual event, with a collection of 20 read-aloud videos created, to commemorate the 20th year of the program.

Schools received a Teacher’s Guide with links to each of the 20 videos. Teachers could show the videos in the classroom, share them in virtual classes, or provide the links for the students to access them on their own. Included with the guide was a copy of this year’s book for their school library, Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race, by Margot Lee Shetterly.